I’m Tired of This Bullshit

Can you believe that it has been almost a month since I last wrote anything here? To be honest, there have been various moments within that time where I have considered giving up the blog completely, purely because it feels like I have run out of insightful things to say. Although 2021 has only just started, I find myself exhausted by all that it has brought, you know? My brain has found everything slightly difficult to handle (which is probably an understatement), making it somewhat impossible to organise my thoughts in any kind of meaningful way. Still, if at least one person can relate to the weird sense of being suffocated by current events, then maybe allowing myself some vulnerability here is worthwhile.

So far, a recurring theme is my lifelong attempt to avoid feeling disabled, in any way that I can. From the optimism that surrounded my previous post, it’s clear that I was beginning to find different (and healthy) strategies for distraction. Oddly enough, I was slowly becoming more comfortable within the uncertainty, desperate to believe that better days would soon be on the horizon. Then, we entered into yet another period of lockdown restrictions. Each time this happens, I’m reminded that my version of normality will never be the same as everyone else’s — there’s always going to be something in the way, something that the vast majority of people will never be able to grasp. Almost overnight, the precarious balancing act that had been whirring inside my mind simply began to crumble. To be totally transparent, I don’t leave my bed unless absolutely necessary anymore. By extension, I also don’t wear anything but pyjamas, unless there’s a very specific reason for me to look like I have my life together. Otherwise, what’s the point?

Right now, the negativity seems to be seeping in from all angles. Slowly, I’m learning that sometimes it’s important to hold hands with the darkness until I feel ready to dig myself out again. I need to grant myself the space to process these emotional hurdles in a healthy way, without the pressures of forcing myself to follow any one particular timeframe. Thankfully, though, I have a Netflix subscription and am currently taking each hour as it comes. (Hit me with any recommendations you might have. We can work our way through the weirdness together. I finished watching Marcella in one day, if that helps.)

With all of that said, I am here with one very specific purpose: to draw attention to disability issues in times of crisis. If you have read this far, hopefully you care enough to stick around for this next part, too. Because every day, there is at least some focus on the news about how the current pandemic is affecting the elderly in care homes. Of course, this is a heartbreaking issue that deserves a significant amount of coverage, but let’s not forget that the same problems are also being faced by disabled people of all ages. Not only does this contribute to the narrative that our lives are not important enough to be included within mainstream conversations, but it also makes it harder to access the relevant support.

This felt like an especially timely point to make after the news that Katie Price’s son, Harvey, will soon be moving into residential college. Just like the elderly in care homes, disabled people in assisted living arrangements have also been disproportionately isolated by the pandemic. They are also not currently allowed visits from family and friends, with some of them not always able to understand why this is necessary. Yet, this is rarely recognised within any media coverage. These people’s lives are not a burden and I refuse to let them be forgotten.

Stay home, wear a mask and don’t be a dick. If you want to read more about the realities behind this story, you can do so here.

PS: although this type of living arrangement is not an immediate reality for me, it likely will be at some point in my future, however distantly. It is nothing to be ashamed of and does not make me any less of a whole human being. Also, to the reader that wanted to know my Starbucks coffee order: I’m more of a hot chocolate gal. xxx

My Body Can’t Take Care of Itself

In all likelihood, nobody that knows me has ever thought about how the inner workings of my daily routine come together. That’s probably because I have the ability to hold (relatively) intelligent conversations, which gives people the impression that I can look after myself. I’m still trying to decide whether or not this is something to be grateful for, in all honesty. On one hand, it allows me to be treated somewhat normally (whatever that means) by those around me, but it also leads to my circumstances being forever misunderstood. I have decided, though, not to spend the rest of my life being defined by other people’s misconceptions and prejudices. So, I’m writing this post to offer some clarity. It might not be possible to hangout in-person right now, but I’m hopeful that by being transparent here, people might be a little more thankful for my presence than before.

So, let’s start at the beginning. I can get myself out of bed, although this is something that I needed assistance with until the age of twenty-one. From there, it’s not possible for me to safely prepare my own breakfast (or any meal). My hands don’t often do what I want them to, especially when I’m trying to focus on something important. When it comes to showering and personal hygiene, my mum has to help me. Yes, this is awkward and uncomfortable for everyone involved, particularly since I have been getting older. She also helps me to get dressed, too. Most of the time, this includes choosing what clothes that I’ll be wearing, given that I’m generally too anxious to make those decisions on my own. Once all of that has been navigated, let’s not forget that I’m not able to reach my desired destination without her taking me there. (Before you say it: yes, I’m aware of the fantastic things that they can do with cars nowadays, but none of it feels practical or safe for me. I have also tried to independently use public transport a handful of times before, which only ever ended up being a nightmare.)

If we have ever eaten lunch or dinner together at a restaurant, please know that I would have spent hours looking at the menu online beforehand, so that I could ensure that there was at least one option available that wouldn’t require me to cut anything up. If you have ever seen me choose to drink something directly from a bottle, it’s because I can’t pour it into a glass myself without spilling it everywhere. Very classy, I know.

It’s such a weird thing to explain. In many ways, it feels like my brain doesn’t function any differently to other people’s. Once the basic self-care has been done, my life isn’t particularly extraordinary: I have the same wants, needs and goals as everybody else. I like to have a social life, in the same way that most other people do. Still, the process of getting there does take a little more consideration. It’s hard not to feel like my job prospects are limited, when there is so much that isn’t immediately obvious from the outside. (Thanks in advance, but I really don’t need any well-meaning suggestions about this.)

To be honest, most days, I just can’t be bothered to put in the extra effort. I find myself growing tired of it. If it wasn’t for the gentle encouragement from my mum, I would probably just never shower again. I’d survive on crisps and takeaways that are easy to manage. Even before the pandemic, I would only leave the house if my friends were very enthusiastic about it. It’s a lot to sign up for, you know? To the people that are willing to try, you are true blessings. It’s more important than you will ever know. One blog post at a time. xxx